Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Debug OSB in Eclipse

The following steps will allow you to debug your OSB services in Eclipse a local weblogic server.


1)  Start your server
2)  Open Eclipse
3)  Create a Debug Configuration. Run -> Debug Configurations



4)  Right click on Oracle Service Bus Debugger and select New



5) Enter a Name for your debug config and the debug Host and Port information for your OSB server.  Then click Debug.



6) Add a break point to your OSB service.  This can be done by right clicking on any object in your service and selecting Toggle Breakpoint.




7)  Execute your OSB service.  This can be done through the console, SoapUI or any other tool which can call a web service.

8)  Eclipse will prompt you to see if you would like to switch perspectives.  Select Yes.



8) This will bring up the Debug Perspective and it will have stopped on the breakpoint you set.  From here you get all of the functionality that you would expect from a debugger.  You can step into code, step over code and resume processing.  There is also a window that can be used to inspect your variables.


   

Monday, October 14, 2013

Weblogic Certificate Error (FATAL Alert:BAD_CERTIFICATE)

I recently configured weblogic to work with a GoDaddy certificate and started getting the following error.

ERROR:
Error: javax.net.ssl.SSLKeyException: FATAL Alert:BAD_CERTIFICATE - A corrupt or unuseable certificate was received

SOLUTION:
The solution was to add the following startup option to weblogic.    

"-Dweblogic.security.SSL.allowSmallRSAExponent=true" 


CAUSE:

This error is caused when the encryption strength used to create the cert is lower than the version of java you are using to run Weblogic is expecting. 

Installing Certificate in Weblogic Keystore

If you do not have the certificate complete the following steps.
   
1) Open chrome (You can do this in IE or FireFox too but I just have the steps for chrome)
2) Go to the secure website your service needs to connect to.
          a.  Right click on the lock on the upper left hand side
          b.    Left click on the connections tab
          c.    Select View Certificates


          d. Select the Details tab


          e. Select Copy to file.  This will bring up the Certificate Export Wizzard.
                                                               i.      Select Next
                                                             ii.      Select DER Encoded 


          f. Select a file to hold the certificate. 

3) Get intermediary Cert (Reseller Cert).  
          a. Right click on the lock on the upper left hand side
          b. Left click on the connections tab
          c. Select View Certificates
          d. Select Certification Path tab
          e. Select the intermediary cert


         f. This will bring up a certificate window for the intermediary certificate.  Follow steps 3d-f to save this certificate

4) If the Root cert is not already installed, repeat step 3 for the root.
5) You now need to save the certificates in a keystore that will be used by Weblogic
          a. Go to the java/bin directory that is being used by weblogic.  We will use the keytool application to add the certificates.
          b. Find the keystores used by Weblogic.  By default you can use the keystores in $MiddlewareHome/wlserver_10.3/server/lib
          c. List the contents of the keystore by using the keytool –list command.  You will need to supply the keystore location.  You will also need to know the keystore password.  If you use DemoTrust.jks the default password is "DemoTrustKeyStorePassPhrase"
   
Example:
./keytool -list -keystore /home/oracle/Oracle/Middleware/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoTrust.jks

           d. Execute the keytool – import command to import the certs.  Note: you will need to supply an alias, the location to the cert file and the location of the keystore and you will need to execute this command twice to import both the site cert and the intermediary cert.

Example:
Booking.Com
keytool -importcert -file /media/sf_Temp/Booking/BookingCom.cer -alias bookingCom -keystore /home/oracle/Oracle/Middleware/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoTrust.jks

Go Daddy (Note:  There is a new param)
keytool -trustcacerts -importcert -alias godaddy -file /tmp/GoDaddyInt.cer -keystore /home/oracle/Oracle/Middleware/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoTrust.jks  -storepass DemoTrustKeyStorePassPhrase


Friday, May 24, 2013

Clearing Subclipse Stored Credentials

In order to removed the stored user credentials used by Subclipse all you need to do is to remove the .keyring file.   This file can be found in the $MIDDLEWARE_HOME that you are using for Eclipse.  

$Middleware_Home/oepe_11gR1PS3/configuration/org.eclipse.core.runtime/.keyring

Once you remove this file all you need to do is right click on your OSB project and then select Team -> Synchronize with Repository


Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Setting Unit Of Order in OSB Producer

Unit Of Order is used in Weblogic JMS queues/topics to group messages into a single unit that can be processed sequentially even if the message are being processed by multiple consumers.  For example, you can use CustomerID for the Unit Of Order to ensure that you will always process a given customers transactions in order.

Follow the link for more information on Unit Of Order

Setting the Unit Of Order in an OSB Producer is quite simple.

1) Add a Transport Header action in the Request Action section of your communication node (Route, Publish, Service Call Out)



2) Set the Transport Header Properties
     a) For Direction select  Outbount Request.   
     b) Click on the Add Header button.
     c) Select Defined, jms, JMS_BEA_UnitOfOrder under the Name column.
     d) Select Set header to and set the <Expression> you want to use to set your Unit of Work in the Action column.



Monday, May 6, 2013

OSB Retry Application Errors

Recently our OSB administrator asked me how OSB determined what an application error was for the "Retry Application Errors" setting on the Transport page of a Business Service.  It turns out there is not much documentation on this at all.   So I did some testing.

OSB looks at the  response-code in the Response Metadata to flag an application error.  If this value is a non-zero, then it is treated as an application error.



The easiest way to manipulate this value is to add a Reply with Failure in the OSB service you are calling.

You can also manipulate the response code by inserting a response-code element in $inbound as shown below.  Note: This must be done in the response pipeline 




Note:  I only researched this for Business Services that were calling OSB Proxy Services as that was the architecture for the context of the question asked.  More research would need to be done to determine this behavior when call services outside the OSB.


Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Using CDATA to handle embedded XML

We ran into an issue when we were trying to pass embedded XML through one of our OSB processes.  The problem came up when we had duplicate namespaces between the embedded XML and the XML for our process.   OSB was combining namespace declarations and removing the namespace declaration from our embedded XML since it was already declared in the XML for our OSB process.

The solution was to wrap the embedded xml in a CDATA wrapper.  This is very easy to do in OSB by using the fn-bea:serialize function shown below.

     <content>{fn-bea:serialize($body/*)}</content>
Removing the  CDATA wrapper is also easy and can be done using the fn-bea:inlinedXML function.

  {fn-bea:inlinedXML($body/content)}



Weblogic Server Not Starting Due to Expired Database Accounts



If you are unable to start your weblogic server and you are getting the following errors, it is being caused by your oracle accounts expiring and the fix is quite easy.

Errors

####<Apr 23, 2013 9:09:16 AM MST> <Error> <Deployer> <localhost.osbsoavm> <AdminServer> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '0' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <<WLS Kernel>> <> <0000JsrdyCXFw000jzwkno1HTf7V000002> <1366733356615> <BEA-149205> <Failed to initialize the application 'wlsbjmsrpDataSource' due to error weblogic.application.ModuleException: .
weblogic.application.ModuleException:
 .........
Caused By: weblogic.common.ResourceException: weblogic.common.ResourceException: Could not create pool connection. The DBMS driver exception was: ORA-28001: the password has expired

<BEA-280061> <The persistent store "JDBCStore-0" could not be deployed: weblogic.store.PersistentStoreException: Can't find JDBC DataSource wlsbjmsrpDataSource: javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: Unable to resolve 'wlsbjmsrpDataSource'. Resolved ''; remaining name 'wlsbjmsrpDataSource'
weblogic.store.PersistentStoreException: Can't find JDBC DataSource wlsbjmsrpDataSource: javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: Unable to resolve 'wlsbjmsrpDataSource'. Resolved ''; remaining name 'wlsbjmsrpDataSource'


Fix 

            1. Check to see if any of the accounts are expired
                           select username, profile, account_status, expiry_date from dba_users;
2. If no accounts are expired, you can skip to step 7
3.  Dynamically create SQL that will unexpired the expired accounts.  You can unexpired the 
     account by resetting the password.   NOTE: You will need to substitute <password> for the password you are using for your user.
                            select 'ALTER USER ' || username || ' identified by <password>;'
                            from dba_users where account_status like 'EXPIRED%' and username != 'XS$NULL';
                  4. Execute the SQL generated in Step 3
                  5.  Dynamically create SQL that will unlock the locked accounts.
                             select 'ALTER USER ' || username || ' account unlock;' from dba_users where 
                             account_status like 'LOCKED%' and username != 'XS$NULL';
6.  Execute the SQL generated in Step 5
7. Modify the profile assigned to the accounts that you don’t want to expire so the 
    PASSWORD_LIFE_TIME is set to UNLIMITED.  This will keep them from expiring 
    again.  In my case, I needed to update the DEFAULT profile.
alter profile DEFAULT LIMIT PASSWORD_LIFE_TIME UNLIMITED ;

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Enabling Weblogic to use SSL


Enable SSL on for server in Weblogic

1) Open Weblogic console
2) Navigate to <Domain> -> Environment -> Servers
3) Select the server you want to configure
4) Goto the Configuration -> General tab.
5) Check the box next to SSL Listen Port Enabled.
6) Specify the port that you want to listen for SSL traffic on.






















7) Select Save.   Note: You do not need to restart the server for this change.


Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Creating XSD from XML document using JDeveloper 11g

JDeveloper 11g gives you the ability to quickly and easily create an XML schema document (XSD) from an XML document.   Below are the steps needed.

1) In JDeveloper, go to File -> New
2) In the New Gallery window be sure the All Technologies tab is select.  Scroll down and select the XML category and then select XML Schema from XML Document.



















3) A Create XML Schema from XML Document window will come up.  In this window you will need to fill in information on the schema file you want to create and you will need to select the XML file you want to use to generate the XSD.















Here is some additional information from the help menu on options on the Create XML Schema from XML Document page.

XML Schema
Enter a name for the new file. By default, the filename that JDeveloper creates for new files appears. The extension .XSD is displayed.

Directory
Enter a directory for the file. By default, the directory that JDeveloper creates to store your files appears. To store the files outside of JDeveloper's directory structure, or to redefine what the file directory is called, enter your changes.

Target Namespace
Enter a URI reference of the namespace of this schema.

Prefix
Enter an identifier for a namespace. For example, you don't need to specify an entire namespage in an XML document when referring to its types. You can instread use the the prefix.

XML Document
Choose the XML file to use to generate the schema.

Generate Enumerations
Select to use all current values in the XML data set as enumerated values for each element/attribute in the generated XML schema.

Thursday, January 24, 2013

OSB Error Handler Tutorial


Error handling in OSB is fairly straight forward but can seem more complex than needed.  The following exercises will provide hands-on examples of how error handlers function in OSB.  I have also included a sample project which makes it very easy to try different scenarios that can help broaden your understanding of OSB Error Handling.  These examples are meant to give some guidance but please try different scenarios and if there is something you are curious about add it to one of the proxy services and see what OSB does.
Before we start with the hands-on exercises below is a quick overview of the key points in OSB Error Handling. 

OSB Error Handling Overview

Error handling can be configured at 4 different areas in and OSB Proxy Service.
  1. Proxy Service
  2. Route Node
  3. Pipeline
  4. Stage Node

If an error is not handled in any of these areas then it will be caught in the System error handler.
An error will be handled by the inner-most encompassing error handler.  In other words, if there is no error handler configured at the level the error occurred then the error will be processed by the next level error handler.  Below is an outline of how the error handlers are nested.
Stage Node -> Pipeline -> Proxy Service -> System Error Handler
Route Node ->  Proxy Service -> System Error Handler

Choosing an error handler action

An Error Handler is not considered completely configured until it has a Resume or Reply Action configured.  If an error handler is missing one of these actions then the other steps in the error handler will be completed but the error will be bubbled up to the next level error handler.

Reply – Will immediately reply back to the calling process with an error response and all further message processing stops. 
Resume – Message flow process will continue as if no error occurred.   The processing will continure after the node or stage that the error handler is configure in.  

Configuring Error Handlers

Error handlers are just another pipeline and can be configured like any other pipeline.  You may use an assign action, publish action…. Etc.
In the error handler a new context variable is available ($fault).  The $fault context variable contains information about any error that occurs during message flow processing and is populated before the error handler is invoked.
For more information on the contents of the $fault variable see  OSB Context Variables


Error Handler Exercises


The following exercises are simple and are meant to demonstrate how error handlers behave in OSB.  Specifically we are going to focus on how error handlers are nested and the behavior of OSB when there are no error handlers. 
To complete these exercises please import the Error_Handler_Demo project.

You can download the project at the following link.

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5g0v_BbuvHUV05NaVFOUWxFamM/edit


The Error_Handler_Demo project consists of 3 proxy services.
1)      ValidateID – This proxy service will look at the value of the ID passed in. 
If the ID is <= 5, then it will return a status of “Success” and reply with Success.
If the ID is between 6 and 10, it will return a status of “BusinessFault” and reply with Fault.   
If the ID is between 11 and 20 it will return a status of “TechnicalFault” and reply with Fault.
2)      ErrorHandlerDemoImpl – This proxy service will call the ValidateID proxy service.  We primarily will use this service to demonstrate how OSB handles errors that are returned from a child process.
3)      ErrorHandlerDemo – This proxy service will call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl proxy service.  This service will be used to show how errors are handled when the error is thrown from a nested service.


ErrorHandlerDemoImpl Service

We will start with calling the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl service directly to demonstrate how it will handle errors returned from the ValidateID service.
For these examples remember that error handler order of execution is as follows when a route node is involved.
Route Node ->  Proxy Service -> System Error Handler



No Error Handler

In the following exercise we will run through several requests to show how the service will behave with no configured error handlers.
1)      Call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl service and pass in an ID of 2.
§  Based on this ID we would expect a status value of Success to be returned in the response message. Since there were no faults, it will process as expected even though we do not have any error handlers defined.


  

2)      Call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl service and pass in an ID of 8.
§  Based on this ID we would expect a status of BusinessFault to be returned in the response message.  Unfortunately no status gets returned.  Instead you see a soap fault with a faultstring of “BEA-380000”.   




§  This is because we do not have any error handlers configured.  When the ValidateID service returns a failure it automatically gets processed through the system error handler.  If you look at the Invocation Trace of your test call, you will see that the ValidateID service returns the correct status in the body.  It also returns a response-code of 1.  You can see this in the $outbound context variable.  We are not seeing these in the response because any unhandled faults will be processed through the system error handler and a SOAP fault will be returned.




Proxy Service Error Handler

We will now add a Proxy Service Error Handler to see how it changes the services behavior.
          1)      Add an error handler at the proxy service level.
a.       For detailed instructions on how to do this visit the following link. http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E14571_01/doc.1111/e15867/proxy_errors.htm
b.      In the error handler add a Reply and configure it to Reply With Failure.  Remember the error handler will not be considered completely configured unless it has a Reply or Resume node.
          2)      Call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl and pass in an ID of 8.
§  Based on this value we would expect to see a response message with a status of BusinessFault returned.   This is because we now have now configured an error handler that will handle the error returned from the ValidateID service and the correct response message should be passed on.


          3)      Try passing in different values for IDs to see how the service behaves.

Route Node Error Handler

Let’s see what happens when we add a route node error handler to our proxy service.
          1)      Add a Route Node Error Handler to the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl proxy service.
a.       For details on how to do this see the following link http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E14571_01/doc.1111/e15867/proxy_errors.htm#autoId4
b.      In your Route Node Error Handler add a Reply which is configured to Reply With Failure.
          2)      Test ErrorHandlerDemoImpl with an ID of 12.
a.       As expected a response message with a  status of TechnicalFault gets returned.  Also note how the error is processed through the Route Node Error Handler instead of the Service Error Handler.



ErrorHandlerDemo Service

Now that we have the error handlers configured in the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl process, let’s look to see how that error information will get propagated to a calling service.  
For these examples remember that error handler order of execution is as follows when a stage node is involved.
Stage Node -> Pipeline -> Proxy Service -> System Error Handler

No Error Handler

The ErrorHandlerDemo proxy service does not have any error handlers defined.

Note:  Remember that the ErrorHandlerDemo service is configure to call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl service using a Service Callout.
1)      Try calling the ErrorHandlerDemo service with an ID of 10.   When we call the ErrorHandlerDemoImpl process with this value it will return a response message with a status of “Technical Fault”.  This is something that we tested in the previous exercise. The ErrorHandlerDemo service is still going to return a SOAP fault not the correct response message with a status of TechnicalFault.  Since we do not have any error handlers defined the message will be handled by the system error handler which as we saw in our previous exercise will return a SOAP fault.



Proxy Service Error Handler

          1)      In the ErrorHandlerDemo proxy service, add a Proxy Service Error Handler.
          2)      Execute ErrorHandlerDemo service and pass in an ID value of 11.
a.       Based on our previous exercises we would now expect the service to return a response message that contains a status of TechnicalFault and this holds true in this example.  Also if you look in the invocation trace, you will see that the error is getting processed through the service handler.



Pipeline Error Handler

          1)      Add an error handler on the Request pipeline in the ErrorHandlerDemo service.
a.       For detailed steps on how to add this error handler, see the following link

          2)      Execute the ErrorHandlerDemo service and pass in an ID value of 15.
a.       Once again we will see that there is a response message that contains a status of TechnicalFault.  The only thing that is different with this example is that the error is now being handled by the Pipeline Error Handler instead of the System Error Handler.


Stage Node Error Handler

For our last example, we will add a Stage Node Error Handler to demonstrate that it will process the error before the Pipeline or Service Error Handler.
          1)      Add an error handler on the Stage Node in the ErrorHandlerDemo service which calls the    ErrorHandlerDemoImpl service.
a.       For detailed steps on how to add this error handler, see the following link
          2)      Execute the ErrorHandlerDemo service and pass in an ID value of 11.
a.       The response message should contain a status of TechnicalFault and the error will be processed through the Stage Node Error Handler. 








Tuesday, January 15, 2013

OSB Context Variables


In OSB context variables hold information about the message being processed as well as message content.  Using these variables is crucial in being able to develop OSB services.   I found it useful to have all of the information on all context variables in one place. 


Below is a list of predefined context variables
  
header - For SOAP messages the header will contain the SOAP header.  For any other  type of message the header will contain an empty SOAP header element.
body - Information held in the body will vary based on the type of message.
SOAP Messages - Contains the SOAP Body
Non-SOAP, Non-binary Messages - Will wrap the entire message content in a SOAP:Body element.
Binary Message - Contains a reference to the in memory copy of the binary message wrapped in a SOAP:Body element
Java Objects - Contains a reference to the in memory copy of the Java Object wrapped in a SOAP:Body element
attachments - Contains the MIME attachments
inbound - Contains the inbound transport headers and information on the proxy service that received the message.
service 
providerName - Specifies the name of the service provider(Read-only)
transport
uri - URI by which the message arrived
request - transport specific metadata about the request(Read-only)
response - transport specific metadata about the response
mode - communication style request (one-way) or request-response (two-way)
qualityOfService - specifies the expected quality of service when receiving a message. (Read-only)
Security
transportClient - specifies authenticated transport level user information.  
messageLevelClient - specifies the message level user information.

outbound - Contains the outbound transport headers and information about the target to which the message is being sent.
Service 
providerName - Specifies the name of the service provider (Read-Only)
operation - The name of the operation to be invoked on the target Business Service(Read-Only)
Transport
uri - URI used when sending message
request - transport specific metadata about the request
response - transport specific metadata about the response (read-only)
mode - communication style request (one-way) or request-response (two-way)
qualityOfService - specifies the expected quality of service when receiving a message.
retryCount - Specifies the number of retries to attempt when sending a message from Oracle Service Bus.
Security
doOutboundWss - can be used to disable outboutn WS-Security
fault - Contains information on errors that occurred.    is defined only in error handler pipelines and is not set in request and response pipelines
errrorCode - Specifies the error code as a string value
reason - Contains a text description of the error
details - Contains user-defined XML content related to the error
location -
Identifies the node, pipeline and stage in which the error occurred. Also identifies if the error occurred in an error handler. The sub-elements include:
node—the name of the pipeline, branch, or route node where an error occurred; a string.
pipeline—the name of the Pipeline where an error occurred (if applicable); a string.
stage—the name of the stage where an error occurred (if applicable); a string.
error-handler—indicates if an error occurred from inside an error handler; a boolean.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

Choosing Between Route, Service Callout and Publish

When you are first starting with OSB it can be a little tricky to determine when to use a Route, Service Callout or a Publish node.  All three can be used to call either a Business service or a local Proxy service.  You can use the following lists to determine which will best fit your needs.

Route
  1. Last node in request processing.  It can be thought of as a bridge between request pipeline processing and the response pipeline processing.
  2. You can only execute one route in your Proxy Service.
  3. Can only be created in a route node.
  4. OSB will wait for the Route call to finish before continuing to process.
    1. If you are calling a Business service and you specify Best Effort for QoS (Quality of Service), then OSB will release the thread it is holding while the business service executes.
    2. If you are calling a Business service and you specify Exactly Once or At Least Once for QoS, then OSB will hold onto the thread while the business service executes.
    3. If you are calling a local Proxy service, then OSB will hold onto the thread until the Proxy service finishes executing.
Service Callout
  1. Can have multiple Service Callout nodes in a Proxy service.
  2. Pipeline processing will continue after a Service Callout.
  3. Can be invoked from the request and/or response pipelines.
  4. Used to enrich the incoming request or outgoing response. For example, a call to get a country code.
  5. Used for real time request/response calls (Synchronous calls).
  6. OSB will hold a thread and not continue until the Service Callout completes.
  7. Can tie up resources and degrade performance under heavy loads.
Publish
  1. Can be synchronous or asynchronous
    1. If you are calling a business service with a Quality of Service of Best Effort , then it will be an asynchronous call.
    2. If you call a business service with a Quality of Service of Exactly Once or At Least Once, OSB will wait until the processing completes in the business service completes before proceeding and it is effectively a synchronous call.
    3. If you are calling a local proxy service, OSB will wait until the processing in the local proxy service completes and it is effectively a synchronous call.
  2. Can be invoked from the request and/or response pipelines.
  3. Best to use when you do not need to wait for a response from the process you are calling (Fire and Forget.... Asynchronous Calls)

For more detailed information on the differences between a Route and a Service Callout including how OSB handles threads during each of these calls see OSB, Service Callouts and OQL - Part 1.

Monday, January 7, 2013

Out of Memory Error When Deploying From Eclipse


While trying to deploy OSB changes from Eclipse to Weblogic I was getting the following error:

Runtime exception occurred during publish. The publish is aborted. Please report the bug with the stack trace. The stack can be found on the log and the Error Log view. java.lang.reflect.UndeclaredThrowableException






















The below error was reported in the Weblogic Server Log

<Jan 7, 2013 11:34:39 AM MST> <Error> <ALSB Console> <BEA-494002> <Internal error occured in OSBConsole : null
java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException
        at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
        at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
        at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
        at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
        at com.bea.alsb.console.support.ConsoleSideMBeanInvocationHandler.__invoke(ConsoleSideMBeanInvocationHandler.java:113)
        Truncated. see log file for complete stacktrace
Caused By: java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
        at java.util.Arrays.copyOf(Arrays.java:2786)


The fix for this problem was very straight forward.  I just had to increase the max java heap space that was available to the Weblogic server.   This was done by setting the USER_MEM_ARGS environmental variable and restarting Weblogic.   Weblogic Service will use the memory settings in this variable when it is starting up. 

export USER_MEM_ARGS="-Xms256m -Xmx1024m -XX:CompileThreshold=8000 -XX:PermSize=256m  -XX:MaxPermSize=1024m"

-Xms -> Minimum Java Heap Size
-Xmx -> Maximum Java Heap Size
-XX:PermSize -> Minimum PermGen Size
-XX:MaxPermSize -> Maximum PermGen Size

Creating a Business Service to Access a Database Table in OSB


There are several steps that need to be completed before you can create a business service in OSB to access/modify data in a database table.  At a high level you will need to create the JCA Adapter files in JDeveloper, create the data source/connection pools in Weblogic and then import the JCA Adapter files into OSB.  Below are the detailed steps.
1.   Create JCA Adapter in JDeveloper
         a.  See Creating a JCA Database Adapter in JDeveloper for more details.
2.  Create a zip file with the JCA Adapter files that you need for the import.  It needs to be in a zip file to import into OSB.  Note: You can get the location of these files by clicking on them in JDeveloper.
         a. Add the following to the zip file
                  i. <Project>.wsdl
                  ii. <Project>_db.jca
                  iii. <Project>_db-or-mappings.xml
                  iv. <Project>_table.xsd
3. Create a New Data Source in  Weblogic
         a.  For more details on this step see  Steps for Creating a New Data Source in Weblogic
4. Link DB Adapter outbound connection pool to a data source
         a. For more details on this step see Linking DB Adapter Outbound Connection Pool to Data Source
5.  Import JCA Adapter files
         a. Log into the OSB Console
         b. Navigate to the project you are working on
         c. Create a directory to hold the JCA Adapter files (<Project>/Resources/jca)
         d. In the Create Resource menu, select Bulk -> Zipped Resources




         e. Select the zip file created in step 2.



         f. Select Next
         g. All of the files that you added to your zip file in step 2 should now be displayed on the Review Loaded Resources page.


         h. Select Import.
         i . Fix Conflicts.   

Note: You will need to fix any path conflicts caused by moving all of the files into the same area. In JDev the schema files are in a different directory.

                  i. Click on View Conflicts.



                   ii. Start by fixing the wsdl conflict as this should resolve all of the conflicts. This can be fixed by changing the schemaLocation.


                  iii. Activate Changes.

4. Create Business Service
         a.  Create WSDL that will be used by the Business Service. This WSDL will have the operations that you specified when you were creating the JCA Database Adapter in step 1.
                  i.  Navigate to the *.jca file that was imported in Step 3 (<Project>/Resources/jca)
                  ii. In the Actions column next to the JCA Binding file imported click on the Generate WSDL and Service from this JCA binding resource button.


                  iii.  Specify the new WSDL Name and New Service Name. Also, choose a location for the new WSDL file. To avoid confusion, we put it in the BuisnessServices folder.


                  iv. Select Generate










Friday, January 4, 2013

Linking DB Adapter Outbound Connection Pool to Data Source

The following steps show how to link a Database Adapter Outbound Connection Pool to a Data Source in Weblogic.  These steps are intended for developers who are making these changes in their virtual machine or in the development environment. 

1.  Log into Weblogic
2. Go under Deployments and select DBAdapter













3.  Navigate to the Outbound Connection Pools tab which can be found by selecting the Configuration tab .  Then select New.









4.   Enter the JNDI Name and then select Next.   The value entered should match the JNDI name from the JCA resource you are using to connect to the database.  This can be found in the *.jca file in the location attribute.   

















5.   Add a JDBC name in the xADataSourceName Property and then Save Changes.  This JDBC name should map to the Weblogic Data Source that points to the database you want to connect to.  If you have not already created a Weblogic Data Source, see this page.